Posts Tagged ‘Photo of the Week’

Photo of the Week

Wednesday, June 19th, 2013

BlanchardFor my final entry on Photo of the Week, I have decided to write about Amos Blanchard, for whom the Blanchard House was named.

The Blanchard family were all French Protestants, emigrating from what records suggest to be Normandy. Amo’s ancestor, Thomas Blanchard, was for whom Haggett’s Pond was orginally named. Amos was the son of Joshua Blanchard, and was born in 1773 in New Hampshire. At the age of 14, Amos was sent back to Andover to live on the Phillips Academy Campus. He stayed with his uncle, and at the age of 18, he became an assitant to the school’s founder, Samuel Phillips. In 1802, the year his uncle died, Blanchard married Elizabeth Jenkins, and continued to live on campus. Eventually, he and Jenkins started to board students as there were no dorms back then. Amos, in 1804, started a job of surverying, and by 1807, was buying and selling large amounts of Andover land.

Amos was named moderator of the South Parish Church in 1812, which was a prestigious status. He served as treasurer and trustee from 1815-1847. However, Blanchard is most well-known for his purchase of large property, the Blanchard House, in 1818. He added a barn to the house, and designed the house further. This cost a total of 3, 250 dollars. This property is now the home of the Andover Historical Society. Blanchard died in 1847, as one of the most successful men in Andover.

Thanks to everyone who has been reading these blog posts the last year. I enjoyed writing them, as I learned a lot about Andover history, and I hope the readers did too!

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

1989.069.30About a month ago, Andover’s annual tradition of Clowntown took place. This event has been occuring for over 50 years, and is immensly popular among the little and even older kids of Andover. This two-day event includes a variety of rides, games, and food. Members of the Andona Society, which runs Clowtown, dress up as clowns, hence the name Clowtown. The fair is actually a fundraiser for the Andona Society, which puts the money raised to good use. Some of it goes towards youth programs, while ten-thousand dollars are given out in scholarships yearly to deserving Andover High School students. Although this event will not be taking place for another eleven months, the hours are 6-10 P.M. on the opening Friday, and 9-4 on the succeeding Saturday. It is one of Andover’s signature fairs, and it worth attending.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013

abbot houseThe Benjamin Abbot House is the second oldest existing building in Andover. Located at the corner of Argilla Road and Andover Street, the Abbot Homestead resembles a barn with its red color and old look. The earlier parts of this house were said to have been built in 1711, making the house over 300 years old. The house was owned by eight generations of Abbot families until it was sold in 1933. Currently, it is privately owned and used.

However, the historical significance of this house were the namesake’s role in the Salem Witch Trials. Benjamin Abbot wrongly accused Martha Carrier of witchcraft. This led to Carrier’s death by hanging, and was one of many deaths in the witch craze. Not many residents know the figure whom this house was named after, and the crime he committed by unfairly accusing Carrier of killing one of his cows through witchcraft. This house still stands today, and is one of the more famous buildings in Andover.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

kritclassicThis upcoming Sunday, June 2nd, is the fifth annual Krit Classic in Andover. This 5-K Run/Walk was started to raise money for the Krit Kearins Memorial Scholarship Fund. In 2008, Krit died of a bicycle accident in Boston, and the race has been an annual Andover event since then. The money raised towards this scholarship by runners will be given to a dedicated Andover High School athlete who shows the same sportsmanship as Krit did. The race, similar to the Feaster Five on Thanksgiving, is entirely in Andover. The course starts at West Middle School, and then leads to Red Spring Road. It then follows Red Spring as it turns to Andover Street, and the course turns around at Blood Road. Eventually, the course finishes at the driveway of Andover High School. Aside from the main event, there is a Kid’s 1 mile Run as well, so everyone can participate in the festivities. The race will continue to take place, and is a fun event for anyone into running, or who just wants to walk.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

LenoRecently, Jay Leno announced his intention to step down as the host of the Tonight Show on NBC after the completion of the Winter Olympics in 2014. Leno, although not known by some, grew up here in Andover. He was an immensely successful comedian, one of the more famous to exist.

Leno attended high school in what is now West Middle School. He was not an excellent student, as he was recommended to drop out of high school by his counselor. However, he later obtained a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy from Emerson College. In the 1970’s, Leno commenced with his acting career, starring in several minor films. In 1987, he substituted Johnny Carson as the host of the Tonight Show. He took over the position in 1992, and continued to host until 2009. He continued with stand-up comedy throughout this time. In 2009, Conan O’Brien succeeded him, prompting Leno to host the new “Jay Leno Show”. However, due to low ratings and confliction with the Winter Olympics of 2010, he went back to hosting the Tonight Show. In April of 2013, it was announced Jimmy Fallon would take over to attract younger viewers.

Leno’s career was amazing, and even more so to know he originated from Andover.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

Sunset Rock, above, is measured to be approximately two-hundred and fifty feet above sea level. The reservation is located between Sunset Rock Road and Porter Road, and is the property of AVIS. The rock is the beginning of a ledge, which extends parallel to Sunset Rock Road  in Andover. This ledge enters the woods and extends deep within them. The crevices in the rocks hold enough soil to allow some trees, specifically ashes and junipers, to grow. The ledge is known for being an excellent place for climbers. There are several trails in the reservation, all marked by white rectangles on trees. The rock itself is known for the fantastic views it provides and its good climbing surface. This reservation was purchased in 1998 by AVIS, and is one of the many amazing reservations in Andover.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

1995.524.01

This is the graduating class of 1995 from the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Techincal School, also known as the “Voc.” The Voc was established in 1963, and provides a four-year education in various technical fields. The school has several student organizations and interscholastic athletic programs. The purpose of the Voc is to educate students in vocational and technical careers. There are several different fields, including automotive, carpentry, electrical, plumbing, marketing, and biotechnology. Students enrolled in these programs must have attained a Certificate of Proficiency in their chosen field in order to graduate. After going through an exploratory process, the students will then enter one of the optional field. The Voc is l0cated on River Road in Andover, and serves the towns of Lawrence, Andover, North Andover, and Methuen.

The Voc provides an excellent opportunity for those students who wish to enter a technical career.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, April 17th, 2013

1994.119

William Madison Wood, one of the most famous men in Andover history, is best known for his role in the textile mills of Lawrence and his ownership of the American Woolen Company.  Wood was born in 1853 in Edgartown, Massachusetts, a town on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. At the age of twelve, Wood’s father died, leaving him in charge of his family. Wood dropped out of high school, and was employed by Andrew Pierce, a textile mill owner, to work at the Wamsutta Cotton Mill. He was soon promoted to the manufacturing department, where he acquired knowledge of the business. Wood then found a job in a Philadelphia brokerage firm, where he learned about stocks and bonds. Wood was convinced to leave the firm by Frederick Ayer, who purchased the Washington Mill in Lawrence. He hired wood as his manager, creating a successful business within the Washington Mill. Wood decided to move on to bigger goals. He purchased several struggling mills in Lawrence, and joined them together under “The Woolen Trust.” He renamed it the American Woolen Company, and built a massive company.

Over time tense relations grew between management and laborers leading to  the Bread and Roses Strike of 1912. Mill workers demanded better conditions, higher wages, and fewer hours. Wood eventually agreed to their demands after a long struggle, improving the lives of mill workers.

Wood is known for developing Shawsheen Village. In 1926, when out for a drive, Wood exited his car and committed suicide, ending his life as a successful mill owner. Wood may not have been admired by workers, but his contributions toward the textile mill business cannot be forgotten.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

2009.019.03

Located near the center of town, the tower shown here is passed by local Andover residents daily.  The Memorial Bell Tower located at the Phillips Academy campus is often the first thing people notice while driving by the school. The tower is the result of a donation by Sam Fuller, and stands as a memorial for the eighty-five Andover veterans who died in service during World War I. The tower was originally designed by architect Guy Lowell in 1919. It was placed at the site of the old training ground where Andover soldiers prepared for the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War.

The tower was made in 1923,  composed of steel covered in brick. This tower would later undergo reconstruction in 2005. The tower contains a 37 bell carillon, one of the largest in the world. During re-construction, the carillon was replaced with an electronic system. The tower today plays the opening melody of the Andover Hymn every quarter hour. This tower is one of the most magnificent sites in Andover and is worth driving by if in town.

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Photo of the Week

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

1999.097.02

At the corner of North Main and Shawsheen Streets, lies a community park called Wood Memorial Park.  Although in the center of Shawsheen Village, this park is not well-known.  The editor of the Andover Townsman once said,   “I’ll bet precious few of the inhabitants(of Andover) know about it either.”

The park exists from a deed granted by Cornelius (William Wood’s son) and his wife Muriel Wood.  The Wood’s listed conditions under which the park was to be built.  One condition was that the park must be named “William M. Wood Memorial Park.”  Another condition was that the park must be used as only a community park, and could not be converted into a playground or used in any other way. Cornelius Wood granted the deed in memory of his father, William Wood the developer of Shawsheen Village and mill-owner.

The stone structure in the photo above  is a memorial fountain dedicated to William Wood’s daughter, Irene Wood Sutcliffe.  In 1994, a push was made to repair the fence at Wood Park in order to create a better impression of Andover to passerby’s who would see the park fence first when when entering Andover through Shawsheen Square. In 1996, for Andover’s 350th celebration, a garden was planted in Wood Park. Wood Park is one of the more unknown places in Andover, but still interesting to check out because of its connection to the history of Shawsheen Village.

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